Custom papers academic service


An introduction to the literature by kathleen norris

It is in the sanctuary of the cloister that she at last achieves healing — finding peace in her sometimes troubled marriage and gaining a new understanding of her challenging life in the outside world.

The Cloister Walk Reader’s Guide

A Spiritual Geography, as well as three volumes of poetry, the most recent of them Little Girls in Church. A recipient of grants from the Bush and Guggenheim foundations, she has been in residence twice at the Institute for Ecumenical and Cultural research at St. She and her husband live in South Dakota.

The Psalms with Commentary

What are the similarities for her between a writing apprenticeship and a spiritual quest? Why does the latter prove so much more fulfilling? What other things do people use as replacements for religion, and why do you think they so often fall short of the kind of life epitomized by the Benedictines?

Why do they persist in their anachronistic lifestyle and practices? Did it inspire you to pursue these ideas further?

  1. Did it inspire you to pursue these ideas further?
  2. Are you attracted to the alternative the author describes? Was there any fear or resistance on your part?
  3. What is the value of the traditional in comparison to that of the trendy?
  4. Has this been your experience? Are there any of your own childhood experiences in established religion that have interfered with your spiritual development?

One of the wonderful paradoxes in this book is that only by immersing herself in life among celibates is the author finally able to understand and find peace in her marriage. How has the monastic life helped her in her relationship with her husband? The author is continually amazed by the perspective of time in a monastery as compared to that of the world outside.

  • Why does the latter prove so much more fulfilling?
  • One of the wonderful paradoxes in this book is that only by immersing herself in life among celibates is the author finally able to understand and find peace in her marriage;
  • How do your homes and workplaces differ from monasteries?
  • Did it make you subsequently more welcoming of new experiences?

How are these different attitudes reflected in the ways we treat our elderly and approach death? How is making peace with time vital to our being at ease with ourselves spiritually?

What is the significance of the Rule of St.

  1. Why do they persist in their anachronistic lifestyle and practices? A recipient of grants from the Bush and Guggenheim foundations, she has been in residence twice at the Institute for Ecumenical and Cultural research at St.
  2. The author conveys several times her complete astonishment at finding herself a resident in a monastery.
  3. She and her husband live in South Dakota. Celibacy is a little-understood lifestyle, and the author does much to illuminate it in this book.
  4. Have you ever experienced, as she does, a new environment that became life-changing?

How can you employ this rule in your own life? Has this been your experience? What is the role of silence in spiritual life, and why is silence so hard to come by in our culture? After reading this book, do you consider yourself skilled at listening? Celibacy is a little-understood lifestyle, and the author does much to illuminate it in this book.

Do you agree that celibacy allows individuals to be of greater service to God and each other? Do you think the Catholic church should continue to require its priests, nuns, and monks to make this vow?

Have you ever had a personal relationship with a celibate?

Questions and Topics for Discussion

Discuss the dramatic contrast between monastic culture and our consumer culture. How do your homes and workplaces differ from monasteries? Are you attracted to the alternative the author describes?

  • Discuss the dramatic contrast between monastic culture and our consumer culture;
  • Do you agree that celibacy allows individuals to be of greater service to God and each other?
  • Do you think contemporary changes in liturgy to make it more accessible are detrimental to the practice of religion in the long run?
  • What other things do people use as replacements for religion, and why do you think they so often fall short of the kind of life epitomized by the Benedictines?
  • What is the role of silence in spiritual life, and why is silence so hard to come by in our culture?

How do you think you would adjust to the emphases on prayer, silence, and humility that characterize monastic existence? How do you think we can better expose children to religion so that they will more easily grow into a meaningful, mature relationship with God? Are there any of your own childhood experiences in established religion that have interfered with your spiritual development? If so, did the book provide you with ideas for overcoming the ways you have become exiled from your religion?

The author conveys several times her complete astonishment at finding herself a resident in a monastery. Have you ever experienced, as she does, a new environment that became life-changing? Was there any fear or resistance on your part?

Did it make you subsequently more welcoming of new experiences? Depression is a common malady in our culture, and the author writes movingly of her own encounters with it.

Error 404 Page

Do you think contemporary changes in liturgy to make it more accessible are detrimental to the practice of religion in the long run? What is the value of the traditional in comparison to that of the trendy?