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The many faces of death in the novel the stranger by albert camus

Instead, he hopes for an angry mob to jeer at his beheading.

The many faces of death in the novel the stranger by albert camus

He says that no one had the right to cry over his mother's death because she was ready to live her life all over again. The same it is with him.

  1. The novel is a first-person account of the life of M. In this sense, all human activity is absurd, and the real freedom is to be aware of life in its actually and totally, of its beauty and its pain.
  2. The hope of longer life brings Meursault great joy.
  3. I believe that Camus figured out many of the important pieces of the puzzle of life, but because his own life was prematurely snuffed out by a tragic accident, he never got around to connecting the dots.

So, instead of tears, Mersault. The Stranger ends with Meursault's refusal to renounce his actions, his refsual to show remorse for killing the Arab or for not crying at his mother's funeral.

  • One of Camus' earlier essays, "The Myth of Sisyphus" shows this same hatred for death;
  • In this sense, all human activity is absurd, and the real freedom is to be aware of life in its actually and totally, of its beauty and its pain;
  • He has no regrets; he lives with total freedom;
  • Definition, origins, and history in relation to Friedrich Nietzsche;
  • First, we may escape the human condition altogether through suicide;
  • In this connection, it must be admitted that he is externally very sensitive and aware, despite his lack of self-understanding and emotional response.

So, instead of tears, Mersault and Camus want us to show anger in the face of death. One of Camus' earlier essays, "The Myth of Sisyphus" shows this same hatred for death. There, Sisyphus cheated Death and lived two lives. Rather than be buried, he again enjoyed the sun and ocean by his wife's side.

But Death caught up to him a second time and, as punishment, made him forever roll a rock up a hill, only to have it roll back down. But, Sisyphus accepted his punishment.

Related Questions

An eternity of useless labor was a small price to pay for seeing one's wife, the sun, and the ocean again after death. In the end, Sisyphus would have done it all over again, punishment and all.

Like Sisyphus, Merusault is an absurd hero who: Loves life Hates death Scorns the gods First, Meursault loves life: He has no regrets; he lives with total freedom. Like Maman and Sisyphus, he would live his life all over again, without changing a thing.

He would not cry at Maman's funeral; he would shoot the Arab; and he would refuse to feel guilt for either.

Albert Camus: Life is Absurd, Rebél, Live, and Try To Die Happy

Secondly, Meursault hates death. This is why he doesn't want to see his mother.

  1. The novel is a first-person account of the life of M.
  2. With the former, one no longer sees that person again; with the latter, one's very consciousness, as far as we know, just ends — blit! Assassinations have formed a major plot element in various works of fiction.
  3. Beginning with his first novel A Happy Death, which was not published until after his death in 1960, Camus returned over and over again to the theme that the purpose of life is not to be happy, as many would have us believe, but rather to die happy. Death marks all things equal, and equally absurd.
  4. When this vitality is appreciate, one feels free — for there is no urgency to perform some act that will cancel the possibility of death, seeing as though there is no such act. Did Camus die happy?
  5. But, Sisyphus accepted his punishment. When he gives up trying to find a loophole, he finds his mind ever returning either to the fear that dawn would bring the guards who would lead him to be executed, or to the hope that his appear will be granted.

This is why he doesn't cry at her funeral. He hates those who sit up all night and cry and torture themselves for another's death. The culture of mourning is absurd to Merusault, and so he becomes angry at the old people and Thomas Perez for feeling such blathering guilt.

Expert Answers

Instead, they should all love the sun, water, and each other rather than following a hearse around until they faint. Thirdly, Meursault scorns the gods: He resents all forms of authority that take away one's freedom by prescribing behavior which says one must cry at a funeral; one must live to work; one much believe in God, etc.

All of these institutions limit choice and freedom of the individual. So, Merusault and Camus want us to be angry at his death, not angry at him for killing the Arab, but angry at the entire culture of death: As readers, we too are in that angry mob greeting him with cries at hate. For he is our absurd hero.

  • In this sense, all human activity is absurd, and the real freedom is to be aware of life in its actually and totally, of its beauty and its pain;
  • Masson and they confront two Arabs who have given Raymond trouble that Meursault first seems to think about the insignificance of any action — therefore of human existence;
  • But Death caught up to him a second time and, as punishment, made him forever roll a rock up a hill, only to have it roll back down.