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Organisational equality and diversity m ori and non m ori

The study focuses on different types of violence against women. This is a groundbreaking study, designed to enable comparisons across EU countries and explore the extent and nature of violence against women EU-wide with a view to informing policy and improving interventions to help women.

The study will involve an online survey using respondent driven sampling RDS for the first stage of fieldwork, followed by an open-web survey and an accompanying awareness raising campaign. The data will be used to provide important evidence to European Union and national policy makers, as well as organisations working within Jewish and wider civil society.

JPR are an independent research institute based in the UK that specialise in contemporary Jewish affairs. University of Oxford — Managing ethnic diversity 2009-ongoing: The study comprises a nationally representative survey supplemented by an ethnic minority boost survey, with 1600 interviews in total.

Ipsos MORI contributed to the questionnaire design and carried out cognitive testing to refine the questions. Findings from Year 1 of the study will examine ways in which trust and cohesion may be fostered and implemented in neighbourhood policy. The survey examined people's hopes and fears for 2012, and their attitudes to issues ranging from integration and immigration to Britishness and the Olympics. Ipsos MORI was commissioned to conduct of survey of UK adults who said they were recorded as Christian in the 2011 Census or would have recorded themselves as Christian had they answered the question.

The survey focused on religious beliefs, attitudes and practices. Fieldwork was conducted face-to-face with 1,136 respondents in April 2011. Queen Mary University — Survey of Muslims 2011-2012: Interviews comprised questions on religious beliefs, political views, sympathies for violent and non-violent actions and to measure vulnerability amongst respondents.

Ipsos MORI was commissioned by the Organisational equality and diversity m ori and non m ori Observatory to conduct a nationally representative survey of British adults on their attitudes to immigration and perception of immigrants.

  • Ipsos MORI conducted this study on behalf of the EHRC to investigate the views and attitudes of Muslim women towards work, barriers to progression, religious practice at work and future aspirations;
  • In total around 4,000 people responded to the survey;
  • Interviews were conducted face-to-face in respondents homes and at refugee community organisations RCOs.

The Tony Blair Foundation — Globalisation, development and the role of religion 2011: Ipsos MORI was commissioned to conduct an international survey of attitudes towards globalisation, development and religion.

On the topic of religion in particular the survey covered religious commitment, tolerance and exclusivity, and explored the link between religious belief and philanthropy.

The survey was conducted through Global dvisor and completed by 500-1000 respondents in 24 different countries in April 2011. University of Leeds — Living with Difference 2011: The aim of this study is to measure levels of social prejudice with a representative sample of residents in two cities: Leeds in England and Warsaw in Poland. We are conducting 1,500 face-to-face interviews in both cities. The questions cover the full range of equality strands plus additional characteristics or circumstances that could generate hostile attitudes; religion, is of course, one of the issues covered.

The study measured how students negotiated their Jewish identity with their student life, how they engaged with their faith, and their worries and aspirations. Some of the questions used were adopted from the British Crime Survey and a survey by Stonewall. In total around 4,000 people responded to the survey.

Equality and Human Rights Commission — Stakeholder perceptions and attitudinal research 2010-2011: Phase 2 comprised 97 one-to-one structured interviews with MPs, sitting in the new Parliament in summer 2010. Phase 3 comprised an online survey with 494 online survey stakeholders from varied backgrounds including all the strands of interest to the Commission.

Communities and Local Government - Citizenship Survey 2009-2011: The survey was one of the largest surveys across government and was used widely to measure a number Public Service Agreement PSA targets including on community cohesion as well as informing policy.

  • The programme of research comprised an evidence review, qualitative research as well as a quantitative survey;
  • Harvard University — Social attitudes survey 2008-2009;
  • Fieldwork was conducted face-to-face with 1,136 respondents in April 2011;
  • The study will involve an online survey using respondent driven sampling RDS for the first stage of fieldwork, followed by an open-web survey and an accompanying awareness raising campaign.

The survey comprised a nationally representative core sample of 10,000 people across England and Wales and a booster of a further 5,000 ethnic minority residents. For the first time in 2009 the survey also involved a booster of Muslim residents. This online survey with Jewish people in Britain collected opinion and attitudes about Jewish identity.

The survey also measured level of engagement with Israel, asking for opinions on the political situation in Israel, level of support for actions taken by the Israeli government and views on how Israel is and should be represented in the media. Cardiff University — Survey of Muslims 2010: The first wave was face-to-face with the follow-up interview by telephone. The principal objective of the survey was to examine contextual and psychological predictors of a sense of British identity, political participation and attitudes towards violent extremism among Muslims living in Britain.

Ipsos MORI worked with the team at Cardiff on developing the questionnaire, which included a number of sensitive questions. The study involved a scoping stage, questionnaire development stage, and pilot study. The questionnaire included measures of identity, whether people from different religions and ethnicities interacted in their community and volunteering.

Equality and Human Rights Commission — Equality duties and schools research 2010: The programme of research comprised an evidence review, qualitative research as well as a quantitative survey.

Interviews were conducted face-to-face in respondents homes and at refugee community organisations RCOs. Ipsos MORI conducted this study on behalf of the EHRC to investigate the views and attitudes of Muslim women towards work, barriers to progression, religious practice at work and future aspirations. Over four hundred Muslim women were interviewed. This large scale telephone survey explored public attitudes towards race in Britain to mark the 10th Anniversary of the Stephen Lawrence Inquiry.

The survey involved a nationally representative sample of the general public as well as booster samples among specific ethnic and religious groups.

Today’s key fact: you are probably wrong about almost everything

Equality and Human Rights Commission — Attitudes to race and religion 2009: The survey asked a range of adults across the country about their attitudes to race and religion, the degree to which they think racial tolerance has changed, if at all, over the last ten years, and how much, and whether, people from different ethnic and religious backgrounds mix.

In addition, it asked whether the public now think the police have moved on and are serving all parts of the community fairly. We carried out a telephone survey of 1,498 interviews across three target groups in Great Britain: Harvard University — Social attitudes survey 2008-2009: The survey was conducted amongst Muslims in Great Britain with a parallel survey amongst the general population in Northern Ireland, the Republic of Ireland, and Great Britain.

The objective of the research was to find out whether there are significant differences in social, political and religious attitudes between the groups surveyed and, if so, what these are. Ipsos MORI held an interactive forum bringing together 45 young ethnic minority women Pakistanis, Bangladeshis, Black African and Black Caribbean along with 16 businesses — both large and small - to discuss ways in which to increase the representation of ethnic minority women in the workplace and how to overcome barriers to entry and progression in the workplace.

The forum was also attended by a number of observers from across Government, including Caroline Flint, Minister of State for Employment and Welfare Reform. We worked closely with the Commission on Integration and Cohesion to conduct a large scale survey of public opinion. The study involved a number of booster surveys among ethnic minorities, people living in areas that have seen a recent increase in Eastern European migration, and areas that have experienced recent far right activity.

The survey explored issues towards immigration, values, access to public services and the extent to which people mix with people from different backgrounds.