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Body cameras should be worn by police officers all the time

Three days after Jordan was killed, the officer who shot him was fired and now faces murder charges. As the investigation continues, one thing is absolutely clear — video technology is shaping our world, particularly in the context of police oversight. Technology is neither good nor bad.

Body Cameras Help Everyone — Including the Police

As the program sparks healthy debate throughout the City and the country, I believe there is both a challenge and an opportunity in using this new technology — with privacy and justice as shared priorities. Concerns about how data will be collected, held, used and shared are legitimate. Yet body-worn camera footage — just like bystander and surveillance video — can be a tool for police accountability and for supporting officers who behave lawfully.

Investigators review many types of evidence, including video recordings from diverse sources like surveillance cameras, cell phones from witnesses and, in rare case, body-worn cameras. Video footage provides investigators objective details of incidents. The CCRB recently analyzed allegations of misconduct in New York City over the last five years, and it found that these recordings help the CCRB make more determinations in allegations of police misconduct than in those without video.

  1. If implemented, it would allow the CCRB to hasten investigations, which is good for all involved in allegations of misconduct.
  2. Opinions expressed do not necessarily reflect the views of TIME editors.
  3. But video helps curb misconduct by officers and civilians alike.
  4. Yet body-worn camera footage — just like bystander and surveillance video — can be a tool for police accountability and for supporting officers who behave lawfully. It helps determine what may have happened in police misconduct cases.

Currently, much of this footage is from civilians and CCTV. Thanks to video footage, CCRB has been able to substantially increase the cases we resolve.

  1. Members of the public can request officers switch off or not record. A list of commands currently using them is available here.
  2. Over 800 cameras are deployed across the NT.
  3. If a body camera is used it can deter a person from coming forward as a witness for fear of public exposure, retaliation or another issue. Why weren't the body cameras activated?
  4. Video footage provides investigators objective details of incidents.

Often, a civilian and a police officer will have different accounts of what happened. A video can tip the balance where we have to show that the evidence supports one version over another.

This independent verification benefits all parties. Over the last five years, on average, the CCRB was able to substantiate police misconduct with video at twice the rate of misconduct without video — 18.

  • If implemented, it would allow the CCRB to hasten investigations, which is good for all involved in allegations of misconduct;
  • Amidst the grief and shock, Minneapolis Mayor Betsy Hodges asked the question everyone has about the killing;
  • Body-worn cameras provide investigators with another source of evidence so we can better understand an incident and make an appropriate determination;
  • Video footage provides investigators objective details of incidents;
  • As the pilot continues, the NYPD must develop an inclusive process with stakeholders like the CCRB, civil rights groups, and advocates, to ensure our city has rigorous and well-informed body-worn camera policies;
  • A video can tip the balance where we have to show that the evidence supports one version over another.

Video may not be definitive in every allegation within every complaint, but it can help significantly. Body-worn cameras provide investigators with another source of evidence so we can better understand an incident and make an appropriate determination.

  • Are police in Australia required to wear body cameras, and if so - do they have to turn them on?
  • Over the last five years, on average, the CCRB was able to substantiate police misconduct with video at twice the rate of misconduct without video — 18.

Some communities — particularly communities of color — have legitimate concerns about being overly surveilled. And advocates also call attention to questions of access to body-worn camera footage between police officers and defendants.

The NYPD lacks comprehensive guidance for when an officer activates and deactivates their recording device, and for clear exemptions for use while on patrol. As the pilot continues, the NYPD must develop an inclusive process with stakeholders like the CCRB, civil rights groups, and advocates, to ensure our city has rigorous and well-informed body-worn camera policies.

But video helps curb misconduct by officers and civilians alike. It helps determine what may have happened in police misconduct cases. Because of this, investigators at the CCRB must have direct access to view relevant footage to aid in investigations of misconduct. This is a standard among some police departments, including Washington D.

If implemented, it would allow the CCRB to hasten investigations, which is good for all involved in allegations of misconduct. We welcome outside contributions. Opinions expressed do not necessarily reflect the views of TIME editors.